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What is it like to foster a rescue puppy?

Could you foster a rescue animal?

Here at the NAWT we have lots of pets struggling to cope in the kennel or cattery environment.

Initially if a dog or cat finds their new home with us too difficult, we will appeal internally to volunteers and staff to see if they can provide them a stable home for a few months, however this isn’t always possible.

Thankfully when two nine-week-old Collie pups came into the care of our Somerset centre, two dedicated volunteers took them into their homes and fostered them.

The puppies – Frankie and Spot – will soon be going to their forever homes, but we’ve spoken to Matt Dorber, who fostered Spot for a month.

He said: “I never thought I’d be able to foster a puppy, but once I found myself in a position where I could, of course I said yes when I was asked.

“I volunteer regularly at the Somerset branch of the NAWT and a few weeks ago I was doing my usual dog walking duties and I was told they had puppies!

“Obviously I was excited to have a cuddle and while I was there they mentioned they needed someone to take her home for a week or two, I said I’d happily do it.”

Animals are typically fostered out if they are too young to stay in kennels, or if the animal is stressed.

Matt added: “It’s been challenging looking after a puppy, but really rewarding too.

“She wasn’t house trained when I picked her up so we’ve been working on that and she’s getting better. She’s usually awake between 5:30am and 6am every morning, so that has been difficult.

“Spot is a really clever dog and she’s full of energy, I’ve quickly learned you can’t take your eyes off her at any minute.

“She will eat literally anything she sees, from stones, shoelaces to my clothes if I leave anything lying around!”

Could you offer your home to us and be put on a dog or cat fostering waiting list?

Each of our centres has different needs and requirements.

Berkshire

Our centre near Great Shefford are looking for short term or long term fosters. If you live within 30 minutes of the centre and have your own transport, please e-mail the team on td.reception@nawt.org.uk with the subject 'Animal fostering application'.

Bedfordshire (HULA)

HULA Animal Rescue will not foster out animals to those with young children as some rescue animals can be unpredictable. However if you're in the Bedfordshire or Buckinghamshire area hoping to foster an animal and you have children from at least 12-years-old, please contact hula.reception@nawt.org.uk with the subject 'Animal fostering application'.

Cornwall

To foster an animal from NAWT Hayle, you must live close to the centre on Wheal Alfred Road in case vet checks or training sessions are needed. You will also need your own transport to be able to take the animal back and forth from the centre.
Ideally you should not leave the animal alone for more than four hours while fostering.
If you’re interested and you fit these requirements, please e-mail: cornwallreception@nawt.org.uk with the subject ‘Animal fostering application’.

Somerset 

To foster an animal at our Somerset centre, you should live close to the centre, have your own transport and be at home for most of the day so the animal is not left. To register your interest please e-mail hg.reception@nawt.org.uk with the subject 'Animal fostering application'. 

Our centres in Essex and Hertfordshire are not currently looking for foster carers.

 

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