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Five Fun Feline Facts

Cats are fascinating creatures; here are some fun facts about them that you might not already know…

Eyes and Whiskers

Cats have the most amazing eyes, which can adapt quickly to changing light conditions. Being able to open their pupils wide gives them a strong advantage when hunting at night. Cat’s cannot focus on anything closer than 30cm in front of them, which is why their whiskers are so important in helping the cat sense what is close to them.

If you watch your cat playing with a toy, you’ll notice how their whiskers move when the toy gets closer to them, sensing where it is with more pinpoint precision, when their eyes cannot focus.

A cat’s whiskers are the same width as their body. This helps the cat navigate small, narrow spaces, and helps the cat hunt when pouncing.

Another fun fact about cat’s eyes: they have the largest eyes of any mammal in relation to their body size!

Rita

Purring

Purring is one of many ways that cats express how they are feeling. Cats can purr as a sign of contentment, but they can also purr when they are feeling stressed or afraid as a self-soothing mechanism.

Kittens

A cat can have kittens from as young as 4 months old, which is why it is so important to get cats neutered and prevent unwanted litters. There is no benefit to health or welfare to allow a cat to have a litter of kittens prior to neutering. Neutering a male or female cat is a very straightforward and routine procedure, and your cat will normally be home with you the same day.

 

Owning a Cat is Good for Your Health!

Owning a pet is good for both mental and physical health, with many scientific studieKittens showing this. Some reports suggest that owning a cat can help reduce stress and blood pressure, which could therefore reduce the risk of heart related health problems! 

Training

Cats respond well to positive reward-based training, and at NAWT, we train our cats whilst they are waiting for new homes. Training is a great way to keep them mentally stimulated, and helps a cat’s confidence grow in rescue, which in turn leads to them being more likely to find a new forever home.

You can find out more about Open Paw for cats by visiting your local centre.

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